Sainsbury’s Choco-Hazelnut Squares

I have to give some credit to Sainsbury’s here.

Most imitations are blatant, wholesale rip-offs of the branded good. Today we’re talking about an imitation product of the Kellogg’s Krave cereal: cereal squares filled with chocolate or hazelnut ganache.

Sainsbury’s took this idea, but with one pretty major difference. They’ve sold it in handy lunch-box sized packs, marketing it as an “on-the-go” breakfast cereal alternative which does not require milk. Although this concept is new in the UK (cereals as packaged on the go-no-milk snacks), an earlier review of Cadbury’s Chocolate Squares in SouthEast Asia on this blog shows that it’s been around in the eastern market for a year or two.

Sainsburys choco hazelnut squares(2)

Although Nestle has got it’s 5-in-1 sachets of Cheerios and Cookie Crunch in supermarkets, those aren’t advertised as “milk-free” alternatives (then again, eating cereal out of the box has been something so many of us have been doing!)

So you see: the packet itself is small, at 40g, constituting what “should be” one serving of cereal. I paid 59p for this; which is pretty expensive considering an average 375g box of cereal costs less than 2 pounds per box, and which contains upwards of 8-10 servings.

I don’t like the animal on the packet. I (think) it’s an Owl, and 20 guesses how Sainsbury’s related that to it’s Choco-Hazelnut squares. It clearly does not exclude the “children” target market, given its colours and graphics which could appeal both to young and old.

Small squares. Deformed. Bent? Sheesh. Talk about some bad product consistency here. In my history of eating “squared” cereals, I’ve never encountered such mishaps. Broken is fine, but totally misshaped? That points to some manufacturing defects in the product “baking / forming” itself, which shouldve been picked up early in the developmental process.

Sainsburys choco hazelnut squares

At least it’s light and puffy, despite it’s thi character. To me that’s a good thing, since this leads on to the thicker (texturally) ganache. Too thick an exterior wouldn’t let you enjoy the smoothness of the inner filling; and this cereal avoids that pitfall. It’s got a good crunch initially as well, which collapses into the light puff, and finally, the ganache.

I wonder if it’s worth mentioning this; but I thought the corners were  sharp; angular squares are appealing, but I can imagine something too “sharp” being dangerous to little mouths (I.e Kids).  This might be due to the thin-ness of each piece, since a “fat” corner wouldn’t be sharp would it; but I guess that’s something we’ll have to ask the manufacturer.

The outer shell of the cereal didn’t taste very wheaty: some might like this, some might not. It was more like a “pillow puff” version of Cornflakes, with a clear corn / grit taste to it. It’s also lightly sweetened; I did not detect any “distinct” sweetness worth mentioning on its own.

The ganache was dull as well. It wasn’t “bad” tasting. It had little hazelnut aromas, not even the cheap-sweet-nutella-esque that is so common in hazelnut confectionery. I suppose one can’t expect very much from a grocery store brand. Kellogg’s Chocolate Hazelnut Krave beats this on Hazelnut taste hands-down. There was “chocolate”. Nothing deep-cocoa-ey, but just plain sweetness. As you can tell, I’m having difficulty explaining the taste characteristics of this cereal. It’s just that bland.

A sad thing then, that what was the perfect “canvas”  (the puff) for the ganache had ultimately gone to waste. Sainsbury’s Choco Hazelnut Squares’ ganache was a let-down.

Nutritionally, I’d expect this to fare better, sugar-wise, then Krave. This wasn’t the case. There isn’t much too different between this cereal and Krave’s nutritionals. At 420kcal /100g, they’re roughly identical, sad to say. The 40g serving-size  pack that you buy this in will surprise you as well, as 40g isn’t very much.

(Sorry for not having a picture of this one. I snapped one, but it was blurry, and oddly enough didn’t show that it was blurry when I previewed the shot after.)

Sorry Sainsbury’s, but Kellogg’s Krave takes the cake, and it’s cheaper for the box too.

-The Exercising Male

Mornflake Orchard Oat Granola

Sorry for the lack of reviews recently folks – it has certainly been a busy time with Christmas coming up, but do not fear there is another new review today of a delicious granola from Mornflake.

Although I flit to and fro trying various different types of granola, this one is always a staple in our house, one of my family members absolutely adores it- she eats it hot, she eats it cold with milk or smothered in yoghurt in a delicious parfait..and I can certainly see why she loves it so much as it is absolutely delicious!

Mornflake Apple & Sultana Granola

The granola holds a wonderful light apple flavour, whilst including some freeze dried apple pieces and a good amount of juicy moist sultanas that add a tad extra sweetness to the overall cereal. However it is the texture that I find to be the most pleasing; to me there is a very fine line between too crunchy and too soft – too crunchy and I feel like I’m going to crack my teeth, yet too soft and it just dissipates instantly in milk. Mornflake, well done, as you’ve definitely got it right on this one – although the granola clusters aren’t huge and there are quite a few “tiddly” ones the texture is ideal; it holds its shape well in milk for a considerable amount of time yet still has that gorgeously chewy flavour we all desire when tucking into a bowlful of granola.

Mornflake Apple & Sultana Granola

Of course; however; with any granola, this doesn’t come lightly on the calorie scale and you can soon find yourself pouring a huge bowl that seems a lot less than it actually is in terms of weight – so maybe not one to buy if you’re trying to lose some weight (after Christmas of course, when all the New Year’s resolutions begin). Nevertheless if you don’t really care and just wish to tuck into a good bowl of tasty cereal then I can’t recommend this more…and the best way to eat it? In my opinion has definitely got to be parfait style…sorry milk!

Mornflake Orchard Oat Granola
per 100g

432kcal
8.2g protein
64.6g carbs (22.1g sugars)
13.7g fat (6.2g saturates)
8.9g fibre
0.03g salt

Tesco’s Finest Nut Granola Review

Warning – major grocery chain housebrand ahead. Those who are strongly against purchasing goods from these “big” players, turn away.

Tesco’s Finest Nut Granola – such an average, non-bombastic name.


Let’s attempt the rational review: a cereal review dependent on logic and justification (I’m hoping to draw some relevance to my current degree here; practice some reasoning skills amidst writing this)

I bought this for two reaons, in order of significance:

1) It won a prize in the nation-wide Quality Food Awards 2011: which made me decide, even before leaving my home, that I’d go to Tesco’s to buy this. (Note the blue logo on the top left of the package)

2) I’ve been on a bit of a granola streak lately, so I had some leftovers from the previous weeks to taste and compare this with.

The difference between Tesco’s “Finest” and the regular granolas can be seen in several ways. Price is the thing we jump straight to on the aisle: this costs GBP3 for 500g; while the equivalents from Quaker and Jordan’s cereals are priced at GBP1.99 each.

Then we attempt to justify the price. Finest Granola is sweetened with Tesco’s Finest Honey (boy.) And contains premium nuts such as WHOLE hazelnuts, chopped pecans, sliced almonds, and some pumpkin seeds. The other mid-priced granola brands can dream of whole hazelnuts and pecans; Dorset’s Cereals gives you those, but they’re priced (gulp!) even higher than Finest Granola.

(END logical discourse: you can’t describe taste and texture without being subjective)

I absolutely love the packaging: ziplock bag, useful for retaining freshness. Not to mention that the interior of the bag is lined with aluminium foil. I’m not sure how this helps preserve granola, since there isn’t a specific temperature it has to be stored at, and given the UK’s temperate climate.


Ooh yeah: large chunks, small chunks, pulverized granola bits: you’ve got them all. Medium and minisule coconut shreds too. The textural sensations are quite remarkable, since the chunks are crunchy owing to the well-toasted oats (or, perhaps caramelized sugars); while the coconut shreds are lightly chewy.

The nuts are DEEPLY roasted too (in fact, they remind me of the roasted hazelnuts in Tesco’s Finest Roasted Nuts), where biting into one will reveal an inner “char”. (Darnit I shouldve grabbed a biopsy photo).

So, ok. Crunchy, chewy.

The most crucial element of such granolas which tout a variety of ingredients is how well they meld together. “Cinnamon Granola”, “Chocolate Granola“: these are easy. Just contain the name-sake ingredient in a balanced amount, and you’re safe.

Here though, balanced amounts are needed, but they need to COMPLEMENT each other.

Raw Pumpkin seeds – slight bitterness, yogurty-tang; mental impression of a dense forest.

Roasted hazelnuts – a warm fire; depth of a typical roasted nut.

Coconut – bursts of richness, akin to that of butter, but of a different flavour profile. I have no idea how to describe what “coconut” tastes like.

Pecans – these were the best. Partially roasted to retain the bitterness present in its raw form, yet bearing that crunch to match the textures of the other ingredients.

Honey – couldn’t tell. Tasted like Lyle’s golden syrup, or brown sugar to me; the taste of molasses was prevalent here.

After these descriptions, I wouldn’t say the above flavours “complemented” each other. There’s variety, yes. But it seems as if that’s the ONLY CARD Tesco’s Finest Nut Granola plays. I did not get any distinct flavour that would allow me to recall this granola on a blind test, since it is so dependent on each ingredient.


At 500kcal / 100g, this is hefty. Note that 500g is a small bag – ultimately containing 500 x 5 = 2500kcal (the daily calorie-total recommended for an average man)

I guess I can see how Tesco’s Finest Nut Granola won that award. It’s ingredients are certainly worth the label. However, the chemistry between the ingredients just isn’t there. I’d buy it again though, for the decadent quality alone.

-The Exercising Male

Nature Path Love Crunch Aloha Blend

American granola always seems so much better than the UK varieties; more innovative flavours that never seem to disappoint in terms of satisfying chunks and delicious mix ins. I just knew then, that when one of my family members was going over to the US a month back that I had to say “pretty please” and do my sweetest smile and hope that they would bring me back some cereal I requested.

Thankfully they did and so here I am reviewing one of the delicious morsels that was brought back : Nature Path Love Crunch Aloha Blend.

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I’d tried the Carrot Cake blend before and had fallen in love therefore I was hoping that the Aloha Blend would be equally inspiring;  crunchy granola clusters, toasted coconut, juicy pineapple and huge white chocolate chunks..I mean really what’s not to like?!

I love how huge the clusters are in this granola; there’s certainly no skimping when it comes to the hefty crunchy oat morsels and the white chocolate chunks..all I can say is “wow”, this is the type of  cereal where you just know you’re gonna end up rooting around in the bag to try and find all of the ‘good bits’ and then when you come to pour yourself a bowl..all you’re left with is the oaty clusters!

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The sweet white chocolate, refreshingly juicy pineapple flavours and the earthy toasted coconut create a wonderful mix of flavours that when combined with the granola base just take you away on a tropical taste sensation (I know cheesy or what, but really I can’t express how good a cereal this is).

The granola clusters soften ever so slightly on the outside once popped into milk but still remain a deliciously crisp centre; whilst the milk is flavoured in a perfectly sweet creamy pineapple/coconut flavour..a bit like a non alcoholic pina colada. Wowza!   I know this cereal isn’t particularly cheap in comparison to other granola on the market, I think in the States it is priced around $5.99 for around a 400g bag which is pretty hefty; however if you want a special treat it is definitely worth it. It’s probably a good thing I can’t get my hands on it more easily or else I’m pretty sure both my waistline and purse would be suffering!

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Nature’s Path Love Crunch Aloha Blend
per 100g
500kcal
67g carbs (20g sugar)
7g protein
23g fat (7g saturates)
7g fibre

Mark’s & Spencer’s Summer Berries Granola

One of the main British brand-names in the market (I almost started with “the epitomy of..”, but realized there was Waitrose, Harrods, and many more which my ignorant self probably won’t be able to name), Marks and Spencer, or more affectionately known as M&S, doesn’t offer much of a cereal range. Pretty much the same cereals are available here in the UK as those I recall from my early teens, visiting an M&S in Singapore. Those of you in the know will have had the all-too-familar Marks & Spencer’s Triple Chocolate Crunch, Summer Berries Flakes, and their range of instant porridges.

Today we’ve got Summer Berries Granola, sold in a bag form. I actually like the Artwork on this. It’s got impressions of plants – leaves, ferns, corn crops, etc., with an avant-garde font to boot. Clearly aimed at adults here: I think the font itself needs some deciphering given its medieval hue, as I hope you can see from the picture.

I was surprised when I opened this open-and-reseal-ziplock bag. A fresh, lingering aroma of raisins and cranberries met the nose; and the sight of HUGE, plump raisins caught my eye. Smatterings of cranberries were there as well. Wow.

I retracted that “wow” soon enough. That’s too much fruit. Look at this. How much oat have we got? How many oat crumbles do you count?

More of a muesli than a granola then, since we’ve got more oat crumbs then huge granola chunks (which we all know we love and adore for that hefty bite). Furthermore, on a closer inspection, I’d realized that the initial impression of “too much fruit” was aided by the small crumb size. The large raisins and cranberries had settled at the top: the little oat crumbs gone to the bottom. That meant that some shaking had to be done.

Let’s get down to it.

As expected, the texture was gritty, with a chew of a dense, voluptuous raisin in EVERY bite. I actually liked that. Most wouldn’t like so many raisins in their granola or muesli; but note that these are LARGE, JUMBO raisins we’re talking about, so the chew fills your mouth with a burst of jelly and flavour. The cranberries weren’t so amazing though.

Then, a surprise. Some seeds; some grit, some distinct sour-berries. Ah! Dehydrated strawberry pieces. So small that they were mere red specks next to the rest of the fruits. These were impressive – sharp, clear, piercing.

INTERLUDE:
(I can’t help but descend into a discussion on taste now; the texture of this cereal melds so well with the fruity bursts)

Yes, I couldn’t help thinking “strawberries & cream” when the bursts of strawberry came through the milk. With the oat chunks imparting a “flapjack” aroma (without the butter-taste; just sweet oats) to this, it was like having a strawberries & cream tart.

A pity there weren’t that many strawberry bits. I guess we could go the same way to say that we had a “Raisin cream explosion”, but that just isn’t the same.

The fruitiness of this granola got to me. Summer Berries indeed.

The oat crumble was bad on the textural note: minor chunks barely matching my thumbnail, with small crumbs making most of the bag. The saving grace is that the aromas of oat were fresh: each oat grain had a flavour on its own that was not dependent on some lame-duck sugar syrup, but (wheaty?) goodness which lingered in the mouth to round off a wholesome, breakfast finish.

I was impressed with the nutritionals, initially. At 370kcal/100g it’s much less calorific than your typical granolas. However on further research / inspection, I realized that could be attributed to the high fruit content: 33% fruit, hence almost akin to a typical high-fruit muesli. (Compare Alpen’s no-sugar muesli, and Dorset Cereal’s high-fruit varieties). Not much protein at 9g /100g, as expected. It’s fruit, after all.


This one’s a winner, in my book. Even though the oat crumbles failed size-wise, we have a truly “mature” breakfast granola here. The fruit flavours come through nicely – distinct, crisp strawberry and dense, deep raisins: and these match the flat-ish oat depth as a canvas.

Oh; did I mention that it goes well with milk too?

-The Exercising Male

Alpen Dark Chocolate Muesli

It seems like Alpen are constantly bringing out new varieties of muesli; and what with many brands seemingly hopping on the “chocolate” band wagon it was only a matter of time before Alpen decided to bring out a chocolate variety complete with dark chocolate curls, the usual blend of wheatflakes/rolled oats, raisins, sliced almonds and hazelnuts.

Dark Chocolate Alpen

I absolutely fell in love with the past release of Apricot & Almond Alpen so I really hoped that this variety would equally meet my high expectations and deliver a delicious morning bowl of cereal.

It has the same “dusty” sort of look as the various other Alpen varieties – slightly akin to wood chippings that may be found after a woodwork class; albeit this variety also has really good decent sized dark chocolate curls dotted around, its nice to see these aren’t measly little flakes but actually provide a good sustenance to them and make themselves known in each mouthful!

Dark Chocolate Alpen

As usual once pouring the milk on the Alpen, due to the addition of milk powder, produced it’s usual wonderful creamy consistency/flavour; however I really felt that something was missing, to me Alpen should be fruity, exciting and full of flavour and I just was left feeling that the dark chocolate variety was lacking something. The fruit/nut/chocolate combo does work, of course it does, but its not spectacular, there’s nothing that makes it stand out and I just felt that with so many other varieties of muesli to choose from I doubt I would go back to this one.

Dark Chocolate Alpen

I found that it was improved upon when adding it to other cereals as a sort of “pick ‘n’ mix” bowl of cereal, but on it’s own it was just a bit unexciting; despite this if you’re a fan of Alpen then at least you can be assured that this still carries the delicious texture/milk flavouring properties as the other varieties..and you never know it may prove to be more of a wonderful experience on your taste buds than it was on mine!

Alpen Dark Chocolate
per 100g

389kcal
10.6g protein
64.3g carbs (24.5g sugars)
8.3g fat (2.8g saturates)
7.4g fibre

Tesco Cinnamon Squares Breakfast Cereal

We’re back to the cinnamon cereal streak here in the UK. It beats me why we’re observing this trendhere. A year ago only Nestle made their Curiously Cinnamon squares, which are similar to Cinnamon Toast Crunch in the US. We aren’t just limited to “mere non-textured cereal squares” though;  several weeks ago we had Sainsbury’s Cinnamon Malties with its Chex-like pattern. What have we today?

Tesco’s Cinnamon Squares, with cute gopher-chipmunk-animal-thing to boot.


These are pretty large squares, and textured with lines, similar to Cinnamon Toast Crunch. They fit nicely in your mouth, 3-4 to a tablespoon (with milk).

2 things to note about the texture though;

1)Each square is thick. Like: so thick that it crunches in your mouth, as if it was the chunky outer surface of a freshly-baked baguette. I mean, look at it; it’s almost half the thickness of an old-school-sized thumbdrive (note my love for all things “thumb”)

2)Cinnamon sugar absolutely adorns these pieces, though not to the extent of the sugar coating in Nestle’s Curiously Cinnamon or Cinnamon Toast Crunch. I’m not sure about this, but the sugar GRAINs themselves seemed more coarse than other cinnamon-themed cereals, complementing the above “chunky” squares even more.

Awesome; especially when some Os are thrown into the mix (Tesco brand, of course)

Taste is hard. It’s sweet, with that simple white sugar sweetness. It has a light (too light?) tinge of cinnamon in it that is just enough to “inform” you that you’re having a cinnamon treat. I like the subtlety here, because it matches the wheaty, almost BISCUITy taste of each square.

Cinnamon biscuits. That’s what we’ve got here. Put them in milk? You get bliss.

At 410kcal/100g, it isn’t TOO bad, neither is it good. “A source of fibre” and “wholegrain” is advertised on the box, which isn’t a lie per se;  though I’d take that with a pinch of salt. I’ve calculated the 100g equivalent for Cinnamon Toast Crunch, in order to get an approximation of the serving size in volume. 30g of this should be somewhere between 3/4 of a cup to 1 Cup.

Certainly beats eating Granola (to me at least; i’m sure my compatriot would disagree!), since here you get a luscious biscuity bite, without that hefty calorie-count that usually comes with it!

-The Exercising Male

Dorset Cereals Toasted Coconut & Wheat Flakes

It’s always appealing to me when cereal companies produce small one serving packets – either for on the go, or just to try before you launch into buying a big box and end up eating a cereal that you’re not too keen on for weeks on end! Dorset Cereals started out just making various different muesli but recently they have expanded into granola, wheat flakes and the like.

Dorset Cereals Toasted Coconut & Wheat Flakes

The thing that really appealed to me about the Toasted Coconut & Wheat Flakes variety was the fact that it seemed to be a mixture of all three: oats, oat granola clusters, wheat flakes, pieces of dried coconut, dried fruit & sunflower seeds; it was like a cross breed between various different types of cereal.

I am pleased to say that there was no scrimping on the amount of dried fruit here with a decent 38% consisting of raisins, flame raisins, dates & dried apricot; meaning that every spoonful had a succulent sweet piece of moist juicy fruit. Unfortunately however this is about where the good points end for this cereal; yes the coconut flakes and the sunflower seeds add a nice earthy element to it and yes, the granola adds a bit of body against the lighter toasty wheat flakes and oats, but ultimately its just extremely average.

Dorset Cereals Toasted Coconut & Wheat Flakes

The flavour I found to be quite bland and unexciting and for all of you people out there that think that eating “boring” cereals like muesli etc is just like eating cardboard/rabbit food then this is probably one of the culprit cereals to re-enforce this image. The state of affairs becomes slightly worse when left in milk for a while with the wheat flakes becoming like soggy pieces of cardboard floating in a pool of milk dotted with delicious pieces of dried fruit that deserved such a better background cereal base.

Dorset Cereals Toasted Coconut & Wheat Flakes

You’d think with this being quite a “bland” cereal that it would be relatively healthy/low calorie..to make matters worse..its not! At 381kcal per 100g its hardly the lightest of cereals on the waistline and for that many calories you certainly could get a lot better.

Dorset Cereals Toasted Coconut & Wheat Flakes
per 100g

381 kcal
8.2g protein
54g carbs (28.2g sugar)
8g fat (3.5g saturates)
8g fibre

Kellogg’s Nutri-grain cereal review

Kellogg’s Nutri-grain is a breakfast cereal in Australia, and a cereal bar in the US. The breakfast cereal variant isn’t commonly reviewed: hence the choice to write about it today.

The box is brown. Brown. Brown. Brown. Doesn’t help that the cereal is brown too. Essentially you’ve got something on the cereal shelf that looks like a block of wood, and doesn’t appeal to kids, or adults.

A quick search on the Australian Kellogg’s site revealed the target consumers.

Sportsmen. Nutri-grain Iron men, as they are dubbed. There are several Kiwi and Aussies athletes sponsored by Nutri-grain. As a triathlete myself, I have to say that I absolutely love this one.

Each piece is individually-shaped, piece-by-piece in a waffle-crisp way. I have no idea what the holes are for, since the cereal itself is porous and absorbs milk. Perhaps it adds to the “home-made” / artisan feel that the look for in that comforting bowl of cereal in the morning.

I liked the way each pieces gets soggy in milk. It becomes mushy, and contrary to the conventional notions of a good cereal; the fact that it retains absolutely ZERO “crispy-ness” is what I enjoy most. You’ve still got the shape of each individual piece – the holes in each are still recognizable, except that it COLLAPSES instantly on any pressure exerted by your teeth, or tongue (this is kinda gross, I know. But how else do I describe it?)

Taste is one-dimensional. I guess you can’t expect much from something which isn’t bursting with added sugar. It tastes very wheaty, in the “cheap wholemeal bread” way: and I am inclined to believe that this ties in with the higher-than-average protein content derived totally from wheat (more on that below). There’s a mild malt-taste in this cereal which was enjoyable when taken together with milk (albeit not as strong as a malt drink per se) that provided some depth to the cereal that is (thankfully) unrelated to sweetness.

For 120kcal per cup of dry cereal, you get 6g of protein. This is more than Special K, and the bran cereals out there. You’ve also got a hefty dose of carbohydrate here, perfect for a pre or post workout snack.

I love this cereal, and is one of the few which I’ll make purchase again and again.

Good on’ya Kelloggs Australia.

Now: how do I get a hold of this in the UK when the University term starts?

-The Exercising Male

Sainsbury’s Wholegrain Cinnamon Malties

It is with this review that I have to bring you some shocking news my friends – I think there has been some slight inter-continental cereal “hanky panky” going on in Sainsbury’s cereal innovation department. When I popped into my local Sainsbury’s a few weeks ago I noticed these new own brand Cinnamon Malties gracing the shelves; cinnamon is so often a flavour that is completely overlooked in the UK and despite me despising it as a child I can’t get enough of it now so was pleased to see something a bit different compared to the usual boring flavour combinations we are subjected to.

Sainsburys Wholegrain Cinnamon Wheaties

 

Essentially, from the packaging, these “Malties”..oh wait no, not just “Malties” but “Wholegrain Malties”, looked as if they were the same structure as the popular Nestle breakfast cereal “Shreddies”; albeit with cinnamon flavouring and accompanied by a flying super-hero type figure who obviously thinks these Malties are so good that he just cannot resist pointing at them with his big yellow finger whilst eating a spoonful of the things in the other hand (be careful Superhero Malty that you don’t crash into the gigantic sized bowl!)

Obviously these are marketed at children yet are trying to portray they are also a healthy choice so parents don’t have to feel too bad about buying their kids a box full of them – “wholegrain”, “full of fibre”, “low fat”..need I go on.

Sainsburys Wholegrain Cinnamon Wheaties

So you may wonder what I am babbling on about with “inter-continental cerealy hanky-panky”; well you see these aren’t really like Shreddies – infact I’d say these were a cross-breed between Shreddies and the well known American Cereal Cinnamon Toast Crunch. When I poured myself a bowl full of them and took the initial bite I immediately noticed that these had far more of a “crunch” and “bite” to them than the usual Shreddies; much more akin to the texture of Cinnamon Toast Crunch..maybe even crunchier! I know is that possible?!

It feels as if the “Malties” are coated in a sort of sugar glaze..however looking on the ingredients list they aren’t..whatever it is these hold up superbly in milk and stay crunchy for a remarkable length of time. As usual I preferred mine warmed up and they did start to soften a bit then, but still held an unusual firmness to them that gave a nice extra “bite”.

The flavour is exactly as described really – “cinnamon” and “malt”; nevertheless they do have quite an overall sweet flavour to them but the wheaty malty flavour stops this becoming one of those sickly breakfast cereals where you are worrying about how much sugar you are actually consuming first thing on a morning; although looking at the nutritionals it still does pack quite a hefty sugar punch!

Sainsburys Wholegrain Cinnamon Wheaties

So there you have it folks – Sainsburys have produced something that look like Shreddies yet taste/texture wise are similar to Cinnamon Toast Crunch and have a surprising firmness when poured into a bowl of ice cold milk – maybe its because these aren’t “knitted by Nanas” but instead seem to have been plucked out of the air from strange “Superhero Malty”.

Sainsbury’s Wholegrain Cinnamon Malties
per 100g

366kcals
8.3g protein
75.5g carbs (27.3g sugar)
1.5g fat (0.3g sats)
8.4g fibre
0.57g salt